Welcome to The Kids From Fame Media Blog

I'm Mark & I've Been a Fame fan since 1982. This blog is dedicated to the incredibly talented cast of the show and is a place to share music, videos and pictures. To contact me please send emails to: mark1814uk@googlemail.com

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Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Image - Carlo Imperato, Billy Hufsey, Elisa Heinsohn, Loretta Chandler, Dick Miller


"Image" comes from the season 6 episode "Ian's Girl". Written by Alan Roy Scott it is performed by Carlo Imperato, Billy Hufsey, Elisa Heinsohn, Loretta Chandler and Dick Miller.

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Fame - Lorraine - UK TV Interview July 2017


Fame Interview  from Lorraine UK TV Show July 2017 featuring Erica Gimpel, Lee Curreri and Valerie Landsburg.

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Valerie Landsburg talks about the On Set Photographer


"There was this wonderful veteran on set photographer on FAME many years ago and he would take these wonderful pictures. Sometimes he would print them in big sizes and he would put word balloons on them with funny things that we might be thinking. Here is one with a still from the episode "Street Kid"."

Monday, 14 August 2017

Be My Music - Peaches and Herb - Cover Version


1983 Peaches and Herb covered Lee Curreri's "Be My Music" on their "Remember" album. 

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U.K. Charts 14th August 1982

 
There's no change at the top of the U.K album charts for 14th August 1982 as The Kids From Fame Album stays at number 1 and the original movie soundtrack stays at number 3. On the singles chart theirs also no change for Irene Cara who stays at number 2 but what's happening down at number 46? The Kids from Fame make their first appearance on the U.K. singles chart with "Hi Fidelity" featuring Valerie Landsburg.



Song of the Week - On The West Side - Valerie Landsburg & Cynthia Gibb


 
On The West Side - Valerie Landsburg & Cynthia Gibb
 
 



Up all night now the streets are getting light on the west side.
Should be tired but there's something keeps me wired on the west side.
Air so sweet it almost stomach the aching.
In just one hour the city will be shaking.
Knocked out, undone,
there's just one place left to run. (one place left to run.)

Head up town, now I'm soaking up the sound of the west side.
Needle Square, all the regulars are there on the west side.
Taxi drivers waving like they know me.
Broadway locals traveling below me.
Hold on, have fun,
there's just one place left to run. (Just one place left to run.)

Ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.
Well I'm ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.
Well I'm ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.
I'm ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.

Folks are kind, no predicting who you'll find on the west side.
Hey don't I know you from some place?
Share a cup of a little pick me up on the west side.
Sidewalk drop in promises salvation.
By and by they'll book him at the station.
Knocked out, undone,
there's just one place left to run. (One place left to run.)

Ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.
Well I'm ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.
Well I'm ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.
Say I'm ready, too ready, aha to be found on the west side.

Take a walk on the west side.

Friday, 11 August 2017

Street Kid - 35th U.K Broadcast Anniversary



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12th August is the 35th Anniversary of the U.K. Broadcast of "Street  Kid" .

Here is a witty recap of the episode from TV of Yore Website


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Danny's lying on the floor in drama class, flailing his limbs about as if he's having some kind of a seizure. The rest of the class is trying to guess what he's attempting to portray - but no one gets it right. Mr. Crandall finally asks Danny to tell them what he's supposed to be, and Danny says, "A piece of bacon frying." Doris snarks that a Jewish girl from Brooklyn would never have gotten that, then quips, "I was thirteen before I realized that BLT didn't stand for bagels, lox, and tzimmes."

Mr. Crandall furrows his brows and asks the class to dissect Doris' stupid wisecrack, and she's all, "Wuh? It was a joke." Crandall insists it's more than just that, then calls it "a very prevalent attitude" and "a schtick". Haha! Suck on that, Doris! He tells her that while she's good at schticks, they're a safe, secure, and easy way of getting a laugh. He then glances around the room and starts pointing out everyone else's deficiencies: Danny delivers one-liners very well (that's debatable), Julie only likes to play sweet ingĂ©nues, and Montgomery...well, no one yet knows what his performing arts talents are. Crandall chides his students for being unwilling to take risks or stretch themselves in any way. To that end, he announces the next class assignment: in three weeks, everyone must come to class prepared to portray a character that is as far removed from their personality as possible.

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Mr. Shorofsky tells Miss Sherwood he needs to speak with her, then mutely hands her a completed car loan application. She's all, "Wuh?" and reminds him he's never driven a car in his life - and he tells her he wants to learn, then explains that he bought the car from a good friend. She's like, "OK, whatever" and promises to submit his application to the credit union to "get the ball rolling". It remains unclear why Mr. Shorofsky isn't handling this financial transaction on his own, at his own bank. He asks her if she could teach him how to drive, and she scrunches her face in distaste, so I'm guessing she's not too enthused about being roped into this favor.

Doris ambles down the stairs looking like she's thinking very hard. She suddenly grins, then turns around and scrambles back upstairs and into Mr. Crandall's classroom, then races across the room and stares out the window at a group of hookers across the street. I'm curious what type of seedy neighborhood the School of the Arts is located in - where hookers brazenly operate in the middle of a weekday. Doris asks Mr. Crandall if he thinks she's a nice girl, and he just kind of shrugs and goes, "I guess so" and she dashes back across the room. She stops in the doorway and asks him if he believes in research, and he's like, "Well d'yuh" and she exits the room and flaps down the hall. Mr. Crandall shakes his head and mutters something about Doris being a human version of the Bermuda Triangle. Haha!

Doris stands in front of a store window that's displaying a mannequin dressed in gold hot pants...and in the next scene, Doris is decked out in the gold pants, along with a pink blouse and waist cinching belt, and a pair of red stilettos. She also has a lot of makeup caked on her face that gives her a clownish appearance, and a bizarre purple feather thing stuck in her hair. Looking every inch a faux cheap hooker, she totters across the street, accidentally breaks one of the heels of her stilettos, then stands beside a hooker so she can mimic everything she says and does. The hooker notices and asks her what the hell she's doing, so Doris tells her she's an actress doing some research, and the hooker laughs at her and saunters off. A potential john comes by to check Doris out, and she wigs out and scrambles to get away from him, and in the process bumps into another hooker. This lady of the evening is played by the lovely Dominique Dunne, who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend a few months after this episode aired. Doris apologizes for not looking where she was going, and Dominique Dunne asks her if Donny Love knows she's here, and Doris is all, "Who?" so Dominique Dunne explains that Donny Love is her pimp, and that he doesn't like it when unauthorized hookers work his corner. Doris tells her she's not actually working the corner, then shakes her head and mutters, "This was probably a dumb idea." Ya think? Dominique Dunne says she overheard her tell the other hooker she's an actress, then says she looks way too young - which amused me, since the actress who plays Doris was 24 years old in 1982. Doris says she's 16, and Dominique Dunne goes, "Me too!" (even though she was 23 when this episode was filmed). Doris offers to buy her fellow "teenager" a cup of coffee, and the two head off in search of a coffee shop.


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At a nearby coffee shop, Dominique Dunne asks Doris to empty her purse so she can be sure she doesn't have a police badge on her. Doris laughs at the notion of her being a police officer, but she willingly dumps the contents of her purse onto the table: student ID card, candy bar, gum, and a hair brush. Out of nowhere, a police officer appears and demands to see their identification, then pulls out his badge and informs them he's from the Juvenile Vice Squad. Dominique Dunne panics and tries to run, but her escape is blocked by another cop who has just pulled up. Doris begs the vice cop to let Dominique Dunne go, then refers to her own ridiculous hooker get-up as "a funny mistake". The officer announces that he's taking them both to Juvenile Detention Hall...though it remains unclear what crime he's actually charging them with.

As both girls languish inside the detention center, Doris moans that her mother is going to kill her, and Dominique Dunne rolls her eyes and sarcastically replies, "My heart bleeds for you." Doris remarks how weird it is that they're both the same age (early twenties), but yet so different. Yes, Doris - that's probably 'cause you're a pretend hooker who's slumming it on the streets for one night of your life, while she's the real thing. Doris asks what will happen to her, so Dominique Dunne says her pimp will figure out she's in jail and bail her out...but since he has a mean streak, it's not going to be a fun experience. Doris asks her if she has any family, and Dominique Dunne says if she ever got sent back to her parents' home in Ohio, she'd just run away again. Doris' mom arrives at the detention center just as Dominique Dunne is being led out somewhere - and she turns and tells Doris, "Have a nice life." Doris then starts nattering frenetically at her bewildered mother, recalling the time she saw a baby bird fall out of its nest, then nursed it back to health and donated it to a school, where the kids kept it as a pet. She pauses for a few seconds, then solemnly informs her mom she just found another baby bird with a broken wing.

Miss Sherwood is giving Mr. Shorofsky virtual driving lessons as they sit side by side in one of the classrooms, pretending they're in a moving car. She presents various traffic scenarios, and he tells her how he'd react in each situation. For the sake of other motorists, I hope her training program will eventually include some real life, in-car practice.

A group of students are break dancing in the middle of the hall when Doris and Dominique Dunne enter the school. Dominique Dunne looks intrigued with the impromptu show and bobs her head to the '80s beat. Doris excuses herself for a moment and scampers over to where her cast mates are hanging out. She natters to them about how she was not arrested for solicitation last night, and they all just stare at her in befuddlement. She points to Dominique Dunne and says she's her new friend and that she'll be sitting in on some of their classes today. Montgomery asks, "Who gave you permission to do that?" and Doris barks, "Me!" then rushes back to Dominique Dunne, who remarks that the School of the Arts seems to be "part kindergarten, part zoo". Haha!

Mr. Crandall tells his drama students that they're all unique and special beings, and that they should think of themselves as originals. Dominique Dunne looks impressed and asks Doris if all of her teachers are this kind, and Doris wryly replies, "Not exactly" and the camera cuts to Ms. Grant berating her dance class for giving her the laziest, most awful performance in the history of performances. She pulls a girl named Cynthia off the floor, publicly shames her for her sucky dancing, and makes her sit out for the rest of the class, which I thought was unnecessarily bitchy and mean. Ms. Grant then casts herself as the lead dancer in a sudden, impromptu performance...and the students serve as her backup dancers, which seemed really weird and contrived. Coco starts singing "Celebrate Now, Celebrate Life", and Danny sings along in his sub-par voice...but since he's also not much of a dancer, he just kind of saunters across the floor while he sings. Dominique Dunne looks transfixed by the spectacle, and when the class finishes the number, she holds up her hands and is about to applaud, but Doris stops her and informs her that biology class is next. Dominique Dunne asks if a person like herself could attend this school, and Doris blurts out, "Sure! No problem!" despite the stringent audition process that all students are required to undergo for the privilege of attending this dump.

Doris drops in on Ms. Grant, who assumes that she came to apologize for bringing an unauthorized guest to the school and let her sit in on various classes. Doris fibs and tells her that Dominique Dunne is her cousin and that she'd like to have a special audition arranged for her...then makes up a sob story about how her policeman father was recently killed in the line of duty. As soon as Ms. Grant starts probing a bit, she figures out the story is BS and reminds Doris that the next auditions are months away. Doris begs her to audition Dominique Dunne now, since she's been through so much, and Ms. Grant stares back at her and looks contemplative.

Mr. Crandall tells the rest of the faculty he's not in favor of holding a special audition for some random girl and says she can audition the next time around. Exactly what I was thinking. Miss Sherwood agrees and reminds her colleagues, "We're not social workers" but Ms. Grant scrunches her face unhappily and moans that the next round of auditions is three months away. Mr. Shorofsky asks her what sort of talent this girl has, and she says she has no idea...which is weird, since I figured that would have been her first question to Doris. Miss Sherwood says if they're going to bend the rules there should be a good reason, but Ms. Grant argues that wanting to do a good deed shouldn't be a bad thing - plus, she doesn't want Dominique Dunne to hit the streets again 'cause she'd never be able to look Doris in the eye again. That...should probably be the least of her worries. Mr. Shorofsky offers a compromise: they will let Dominique Dunne audition now, but not skimp on their standards of excellence. Ms. Grant agrees that Dominique Dunne will need to be sensational in order to satisfy the school's super high standards, then rushes off to tell Doris the good news.

At the Schwarz residence, Doris is teaching Dominique Dunne breathing techniques to help her sustain a note while singing. (I guess this means she's a singer.) Dominique Dunne says she's really nervous, but Doris assures her she'll be fine. Doris' mom arrives home and tells Dominique she got a phone message from her boyfriend, Donny Love, and Doris is all, "Ack!" but Dominique says she's not worried, since he only called to let her know he's still out there, in case she wants to return to the streets. She contemplates that for a few seconds, then tells Doris if things don't work out with the School of the Arts, she can always go back to hooking.

Mr. Shorofsky shows Miss Sherwood the car he just bought: a tiny little convertible. Miss Sherwood looks impressed, then expresses concern that the steering wheel is on the right side. They both climb into the tiny vehicle, and she wigs out when she notices that it has a standard transmission. She warily asks him if the sale of the car is final, and he says yes, and that he even bought himself a little driving cap. Hee! Adorable! She says she isn't confident that he'll be able to drive in actual traffic with a standard transmission, and he finally agrees that it was probably a dumb idea to buy the thing in the first place.

Dominique Dunne is set to perform "Blue Moon" for the School of the Arts faculty, and Bruno is providing backup music on the piano. She turns out to be a really bad singer - though not a whole lot worse than Bruno, Danny, or Leroy. Unlike them, however, she has the self awareness to realize how awful she is, and is barely able to finish the song without bursting into tears. When she finishes, Ms. Grant thanks her for coming, and she rushes off the stage to weep shamefully in private. Ms. Grant thanks Bruno for providing the music and says he did the best he could with what he had to work with.

Bruno heads over to where the gang is anxiously awaiting the results of the audition - and he comes right out and tells everyone how badly Dominique Dunne stunk it up. Doris snaps, "Your opinion" and Bruno says, "She's average at best." Julie chimes in and says that Dominique Dunne's dancing bites pretty hard too, so Doris asks them why they didn't tell her this before...and Montgomery says she wasn't exactly willing to listen. Doris says she needs to go find Dominique Dunne asap, then runs upstairs in her weird flail-y way to find her hooker friend.


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Doris is on the phone with her mother, trying to track down Dominique Dunne. She tells her mom she has people on the streets looking for her, which made me wonder who these "people" are: Bruno? Danny? The other hookers? After she finishes the call, Ms. Grant walks over and asks her if she wants company while she waits for word, but Doris declines and says she got into this schmozzle by herself and should therefore get herself out of it. Ms. Grant tells her not to get down on herself for wanting to help the girl, then says it's a damn shame she didn't have a scrap of talent. She affectionately calls it "a very Doris thing to do", and tells her she's very special, blah blah...blech. Doris suddenly perks up and says she has an idea where Dominique Dunne could be, then sprints down the hall.

Doris finds Dominique Dunne in the dressing room downstairs, sitting in front of the mirror and caking makeup on her face. Doris asks her whassup and says she's worried she's going to go back out to the corner and start hooking again. She notes how interesting it is that she hasn't yet left the school, and Dominique Dunne glumly asks, "Where else is there?" Doris says she could always go home, then toots her own horn as she sanctimoniously brags about how her mom is always calling her "the world's twin sister" 'cause whenever she sees someone hurting, she hurts along with them. Doris hands her a dime and says she can use it to call either her parents or her pimp, then pretends not to care which she chooses. A few seconds later, she cancels that and says she does care...and so do a lot of other people. Dominique Dunne takes the dime from her, then contemplatively stares into space.

Doris returns to the hall where Ms. Grant is waiting and informs her that Dominique Dunne was hiding out in the dressing room...and a few seconds later, Dominique Dunne appears in the hall and makes a beeline over to the pay phone. She places a call to Cleveland, and gets teary when she talks to her parents - and Doris tears up too.


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Drama class! Doris is about to perform her scene as a character that's the polar opposite of her personality. She's wearing jeans, a sweater, and strappy sandals with red socks underneath (!)...and swaggers over to a chair and straddles it backwards. She tries very hard to pretend like she's a hostile, edgy street kid and gives the class a soliloquy about her sad, difficult life...then babbles about wanting to find somewhere where it's OK to be her. I could maybe buy this hard Doris persona were it not for the red socks peeking out of those sandals. When she finishes the scene, she walks over to the wall and shows her back to the class...and everyone looks deeply moved and affected by what they've just witnessed. Mr. Crandall praises her performance, gives her a kiss on the cheek, and tells her she got an A+. She then mutates back into regular Doris and glances around the room with a look of smug satisfaction as the class applauds.

Ebay of the Week


This week signed photo by the cast members at the L.A. Reunion Concert.

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Happy Birthday Valerie Landsburg


Happy 59th Birthday Valerie Landsburg for August 12th

Thursday, 10 August 2017

Eric Pierpoint OchTamale UNIVERSITY OF REDLANDS ONLINE MAGAZINE 2017

Some alumni are happy to be part of the entertainment industry without becoming an actor, but others have a different calling. These include Eric Pierpoint ’73 (stepson of another prominent Bulldog, the late CBS White House correspondent Robert Pierpoint ’47).

The younger Pierpoint, however, wouldn’t argue with the statement that acting can be a particularly difficult path.

At an early stage of his career—despite a master’s degree in performance from Catholic University (where he performed in 30 to 40 productions) and a track record filming commercials in Washington, D.C.—he went to 80 auditions in New York City before his first break there. “There were some despairing moments,” he recalls.
Nevertheless, hope—and going out of town to act in the occasional play—kept him going. Before long, he found that one break could be parlayed into the next.
He first discovered his passion for acting while a philosophy major at Redlands, but—despite encouragement from a theatre mentor, Professor Paul Little—Pierpoint didn’t launch himself into professional acting (“the path I should have been on”) until the ripe old age of 25.

Pierpoint now has credits to his name that include the role of George Francisco on Fox Network’s Alien Nation; roles in all the Star Trek television spin-offs; and parts in films such as Liar Liar and Holes and TV series including Fame, Hill Street Blues and Parks and Recreation.

He has also starred in numerous plays throughout his career, most recently The Lion in Winter for the Ensemble Theatre Company of Santa Barbara.

After decades acting in both New York and L.A., Pierpoint still works (he will appear in the upcoming TV series Six) and can look back at many peak moments. These include acting in the episode of Alien Nation in which his character gives birth (from a marsupial pouch). “People showed up who weren’t working that day,” he chuckles. “To this day, I am constantly asked—mostly by women—what it was like to have a baby.”

Pierpoint takes the opportunity to give back, regularly teaching a class on acting for the camera at the University of Redlands. “There’s a quiet inner strength that transfers to film, as opposed to making sure the person in the back row can hear you in the theatre,” he says. “You have to come from a place of truth, not show.”
In addition to teaching film techniques to Redlands students, Pierpoint shares his work ethic and perspective: “I ask [students]to be professional,” he says. “Acting is not just a romantic dream, it’s a craft.” He also helps interested students put together a four-minute reel, the screen actor’s calling card, and notes that for those entering the field today technology has created new opportunities to create independent material.

Ever open to new opportunities himself, Pierpoint recently drew on his acting experience to transform one of his screenplays, which had been optioned but never produced, into a young adult novel, The Last Ride of Caleb O’Toole (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky). The book won a Reading the West Award from the Mountains & Plains Independent Booksellers Association. His next venture into historical fiction, The Secret Mission of William Tuck, was picked up and published by Scholastic.
“I am not waiting for the phone to ring because I am busy,” he says. “I am drafting my next book.”

 

Michael Cerveris - The Big Speak Easy Interview


Michael Cerveris - The Big Speak Easy Interview

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Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Erica Gimpel Reads Letters from Nia Peeples & Carol Mayo Jenkins - L.A. Fame Reunion


Erica Gimpel Reads Letters from Nia Peeples & Carol Mayo Jenkins  at the L.A. Fame Reunion 2017

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With Thanks to Barb Espinoza for sharing this video.

Kids From Fame Media Magazine article on Nia and Carol's letters.



With Thanks To Sue Hinds for sharing the letters.

Director Thomas Carter Interview on Filming the dance on Fame


Director Thomas Carter worked on 3 episodes of Fame during the first season: "Tomorrow's Farewell", "The Sell Out" and "The Strike". In this Interview hew talks about Debbie Allen, The Dancers and filming the dance numbers.

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Monday, 7 August 2017

Desdemona - Sheet Music


Desdemona - Sheet Music

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U.K. Charts 7th August 1982


The Kids From Fame album reaches the Number 1 spot on the U.K. charts for 7th August 1982. This will be the first of 12 weeks it spends at the summit. It replaces the Original Movie Soundtrack which drops to number 3. On the Singles chart Irene Cara's "Fame" theme loses it's top spot but holds on at number 2.


Song of the Week - Makin It - Gene Anthony Ray and Billy Hufsey


Makin It - Billy Hufsey and Gene Anthony Ray




Good enough has never been good enough for me
All the things I want in life never have come free
But even if it's a hard climb
You should know from the start


I'm making it, taking it to the top
I'm breaking it open, I'm getting hot
I'm shakin it, nothing's gonna stop me now  (nothings gonna stop me)
I'm making it, taking it to the top
I'm breaking it open, I'm getting hot
I'm shakin it, watch me 

I'm gonna show you how
If there's a winner it might as well be me
I'm no good at leaving well enough alone
I've never been afraid to go for it on my own
Even when life is not fair
You can bet I'll be out there


I'm making it, taking it to the top
I'm breaking it open, I'm getting hot
I'm shakin it, 
nothing is gonna stop me now (nothings gonna stop me)
I'm making it, taking it to the top
I'm breaking it open, I'm getting hot
I'm shakin it, watch me 

I'm gonna show you how
If there's a winner it might as well be me

I'll make it to the top
Never gonna stop
Make it to the top
I'll keep on going

Make it to the top
Never gonna stop
Make it to the top
I'll keep on going
Keep on going, keep on going keep on going.
I'm making it, taking it to the top
I'm breaking it open, I'm getting hot
I'm shakin it,
nothing is gonna stop me now (nothings gonna stop me)I'm making it, taking it to the top
I'm breaking it open, I'm getting hot
I'm shakin it, watch me 

I'm gonna show you how
If there's a winner it might as well be me
If there's a winner it might as well be me
If there's a winner it might as well be me

Friday, 4 August 2017

But Seriously Folks - U.K. 35th Anniversary


5th August is the 35th Anniversary of the U.K. Broadcast of "But Seriously Folks" Strike.

Here is a witty recap of the episode from TV of Yore Website


It's dance class in the dance gym, and Ms. Grant is chanting, "Stand up at the mic and just say what's on your mind...boogie boogie" - LOL - as her students perform some kind of casual looking dance routine. She yells, "Stop!", barks at the class to loosen up so that the audience will feel like they're part of the performance, then orders everyone to take it from the top. Danny sneaks in late and tries to blend in with the dancers - but Ms. Grant stops the rehearsal, calls him out on his tardiness, and publicly chastises him. He reminds her that he's not a dancer or singer, he's a comedian - and she glares at him and wryly retorts, "Do you see me laughing, Amatullo?" As the class nervously titters, Danny snarks, "No" and Ms. Grant tells him he'd better start singing and dancing...or else. She orders everyone to pick it up from the chorus...and Coco shoots Danny the stink-eye and says, "You wanna be Woody Allen, you do it on your own time. Not ours." He irritably tells her to shut up.


During English class, Miss Sherwood writes the word precision on the blackboard and asks if anyone can correctly use it in a sentence. For a high school English class, this seems like a pretty dumbed down curriculum. She notices Danny nodding off and calls on him...so he glances around the room sleepily, notices the word precision written on the blackboard and says, "Terry Bradshaw is known for his precision passing." As the class giggles at his sass, Miss Sherwood sarcastically apologizes for waking him from his slumber, and he snidely retorts that her class is too boring to stay awake in. She shoots him a really squinty stink-eye and orders him to report back to her classroom after school.

Next class: drama. Danny performs a scene with Montgomery - and by performs, I mean he's frenetically bellowing lines at him. Mr. Crandall shakes his head and goes, "What are you doing, Amatullo?" and reminds him that the scene is supposed to reflect a warm, fuzzy relationship between the two characters. He urges him to draw from his experience of being a part of a stereotypically warm, friendly Italian family, but Danny bitchily snaps, "I'll pass."

Miss Sherwood tells Danny he's clearly having problems in her class and assumes he's probably not doing so great in his other classes either. He denies having any problems at all, so she reminds him he's been nodding off in class. She sternly says, "If it's fatigue, get some rest. If it's drugs, get some help." Danny makes a face and retorts, "Drugs? No way" and explains that he's been so tired lately 'cause he works nights at a sandwich stand. He fibs and tells her that Papa Amatullo got laid off...and since money is tight, everyone in the family has to pitch in. Miss Sherwood tells him his mouth is saying one thing, but his body language is making it clear that he's full of crap. Danny snarks back that he's late for work and storms out of the room...and Miss Sherwood looks dismayed and mutters, "He's been taking Leroy lessons." Haha!

Montgomery drags Doris along on a commercial casting call for a fake restaurant chain called Hank Burgers. The director tells the wannabes that he's seeking a particular look, then begins scanning the crowd. He checks out Doris, who smiles brightly at him, then goes, "Meh" and moves onto Montgomery. He seems slightly intrigued by Montgomery's nondescript appearance, but the director's assistant reminds him he already has a redhead so he murmurs, "Oh, right. Thanks" and moves on. Doris contorts her face and grumbles, "Why do I feel like I'm in the Caucasian version of Roots?" which made me want to smack her really hard. The director barks, "Who just spoke?" and returns to where Doris is standing. He gives her a creepily intense stare and says, "I want someone to look into the camera with their eyes and say 'I'll die for a Hank burger with double cheese'" and Doris wittily retorts, "Eyes don't fail me now." I guess we're supposed to assume that he's charmed enough by her spunk to consider her for a callback.


Danny's at the Comedy Company, where he works as a stage manager. He's watching the resident comedian, a buffoon named Joey, as he finishes up his act. The club's owner ambles over and thanks Danny for doing such a great job as stage manager, then informs him that Joey just got a stand-up gig in Vegas...which means there's an opening. He asks Danny if he's interested in doing some stand-up, and Danny's like, "Yes please!" so he says he'll put him down for the closing spot next Thursday. Joey, meanwhile, finishes his act and struts backstage, and correctly guesses that the club's owner just gave Danny his own spot. Danny gushes about how super excited he is about finally getting the opportunity to tell jokes to a live audience instead of just a mirror...then starts whining about how hard it is to go to school all day and work all night. Joey reaches into his pocket and pulls out a bottle of pills, hands the entire stash to Danny - as if - and advises him to start taking uppers, like pronto. LOL. He says it's important for him to feel good if he expects to make other people feel good. After Joey saunters off, Danny stares down at the pills...and the screen fades to black for a commercial break.

Danny's mother is gabbing on the phone to someone at an all night radio show. She barks at Danny to sit down and eat something just as Papa Amatullo enters the room and grumpily announces that he's working the 3-11 shift. Danny excitedly tells him he got a spot performing at the Comedy Company next Thursday, and Papa Amatullo snorts derisively and says, "Is Friday some kind of holiday?" so Danny explains that he has to go somewhere where he can perform in front of people. His mom suggests practicing his comedy routines at the Knights of St. Anthony Lodge, but Papa Amatullo is like, "Hell no" and says it's bad enough he has a son going to that school, then makes it clear that he doesn't approve of him performing his clownish schtick in front of his friends. Ouch. Danny says he's a comedian (not a clown), but Papa Amatullo doesn't see the distinction and says he wishes he'd get some common sense and grow out of his wanting to be a comedian phase. We all want that, Papa Amatullo. His wife hands him his lunch pail, and suddenly Papa Amatullo looks very sad and tells her he's stopping by the church after his shift to light a candle for Vinny...then heads off to work. Danny dejectedly retreats to his bedroom, stares at the bottle of uppers he got from Joey, then flops onto his bed and morosely stares up at the ceiling.

The next day, the Fame kids are gathered 'round the piano in the dance gym, singing the Hank Burgers jingle. When Montgomery ambles into the room and asks whassup, Doris explains that she got a callback from the "cuckoo bird director". Unfortunately, however, she has a dilemma: she hates Hank burgers and thinks the director is a moron. Montgomery advises her to stop calling the man a cuckoo bird, and to make peace with faking her enjoyment of a Hank burger if she expects to get paid. Danny suddenly bursts into the room and announces to everyone that he got his own spot at the Comedy Company, then asks if anyone would like to drop by and see a young comedian's rise to stardom. Coco goes, "You got a gig?" and Danny hushes her and says, "Not so loud. I don't want to get tossed out of school." He says that his spot will be at 1am on Thursday night (well, Friday morning technically). Bruno says his dad will have a freakout if he stays out that late, and Coco frowns and says that 1am is too late for a school night. Danny gets annoyed by the lack of his friends' support and starts ranting his displeasure just as Ms. Grant enters the room. Bruno discreetly orders him to shut up, and everyone scurries off in different directions.

It's Danny's big night at the Comedy Company. Joey asks him how he's doing, and Danny bitchily grumbles about how bummed he is that none of his friends are coming to see him perform. Joey breezily replies, "You should be flying high, especially with those little bombs I laid on you" but Danny sullenly says he hasn't taken any of the uppers yet. Joey insists that he's going to need a full charge, and says, "Don't go out there by yourself, kid." Danny pulls the bottle of pills out of his pocket and stares down at them again...then walks over to the water cooler, pours himself a cup of water, and washes down a pill. He bitterly mutters, "Good evening, friends."

The club's owner introduces Danny to the audience as "a new kid on the block"...and a few seconds later, Danny bounds onto the stage and launches into his act. He suddenly gets flustered when he spots Miss Sherwood sitting at a table with a gentleman friend. As she shoots him an incredulous, WTF? stare, he turns ashen and mutters, "I'm in deep trouble."


In English class the next day, a restless Danny stares up at the clock while Miss Sherwood prattles about poetry. When the lunch bell rings, she stops Danny from making a hasty exit and orders him to stay behind. After the room empties, she tells him she's puzzled and angry, and he assumes it's 'cause he broke the "no performing" rule at the School of the Arts...which, incidentally, is a rule that seems to get broken by students a lot and is never seems to be enforced by anyone on the faculty. She glares at him and says, "You conned me" and reminds him of the nonsense he told her the other day about his family being broke. He bellyaches about how he's trying to make a start for himself in showbiz, but no one seems to care at all about what he's going through. Yep, I get the very same impression. Miss Sherwood reaches her hand toward him, but he freaks out and screeches, "Don't touch me! I don't like it when people touch me!" LOL. She forcibly grabs him by the chin, stares deeply into his eyes, and says, "You're on uppers, aren't you?" then orders him to hold out his hand so she can place a sheet of paper atop it. He does, and the sheet of paper emphasizes his shaky hands. He explains that he's just nervous about performing, but she doesn't buy that and says she's so furious she wants to punch him in the face. Bwahahaha! Me too! She then clarifies that she's less mad at him than she is at the douchewad who supplied him with the pills. She moans about how pills destroy young people, then snaps, "And I hate it!" and says she's lost many students, friends, and loved ones to uppers. Wuh? Seriously? To uppers? She says that, despite whatever he may have heard, not everyone does drugs - and whoever told him that is a liar and a thief...and by thief she means that this person is stealing his life. She then sits down at her desk, buries her face in her hands and wearily tells him to go to lunch. I really think she's taking Danny's sudden (and, so far, pretty casual) use of uppers much too hard.

The next morning, Danny's alarm goes off at 6am. Papa Amatullo enters his room to shut off the alarm - then notices the bottle of uppers sitting on his night table. He studies it with a look of puzzlement on his face, then puts it back down and tip-toes out of the room. A few seconds later, Danny finally stirs and shuts off the alarm, unaware that his pa was just standing there.

Coco is coaching Doris on how to perform during the callback. She advises her to use imagery - which, in this case, means she should think of something she loves to eat while she's being forced to eat a Hank burger. Doris closes her eyes, imagines her aunt's delicious lentil soup, and thanks Coco for her genius advice.

Ms. Grant is directing her dance class as they do some kind of 16th century dance number. Leroy tells Coco he doesn't use drugs 'cause he thinks of his body as a cathedral and doesn't want to mar its beauty - which is sadly ironic, considering the serious addiction problems he coped with in real life. Coco says he should give his no drugs lecture to Danny, but Leroy just shrugs and clearly doesn't give a rat's ass about Danny's problems. Coco blabs to Montgomery that Miss Sherwood saw Danny performing at the Comedy Company, and Montgomery tells Julie they all let Danny down when none of them went to the club to watch him perform. Julie wonders aloud to Coco why Danny started taking uppers, and Coco says it's not easy being Number One...though it's unclear what being Number One has to do with Danny. Badoom bah!

Doris is at the commercial callback. The director tells her that when she looks at a Hank burger, he wants to see passion in her face and adoration in her whole person. She giggles at his silly direction, then manages to keep a straight face when she explains that she's just generally a happy and joyful person. On the first take, she picks up a Hank burger, bites into it, and clearly wants to spit it right out. After about a dozen takes, she starts forgetting her lines and starts actually spitting out pieces of the burger. The director looks irked and tells the crew they're breaking for lunch...and Doris immediately perks up and makes a beeline to the nearest toilet to vomit.
Danny tells Papa Amatullo that he's off to the Comedy Company...but Papa Amatullo's busy watching a sports game on a tiny portable TV in the kitchen and clearly doesn't give a rat's ass about anything his son is up to. Maybe that's why Danny turned into such an assfuck. Backstage at the club, Danny takes another upper. A few seconds later, the club's owner storms over and says, "We have a problem" and orders Danny to show him his ID. Apparently, the club received an anonymous call saying he was underage. Danny hands him his wallet, and the club's owner snarks that he doesn't see anything in here that shows he's eighteen or older (even though the actor was nineteen years old when this episode was filmed - which I guess is less annoying than if he were in his mid-twenties, like Doris). The club's owner barks, "Good night!" and storms off. Early at school the next morning, Danny rails at Miss Sherwood about outing his underage status to his boss, and she's all, "Wha-a?" and says she hasn't the faintest idea what he's talking about. Danny must believe her, 'cause in the next scene, the two are sitting in the cafeteria, and he's telling her that his dad doesn't care about anything he does and that he's been a sad sack ever since his older brother Vinny died at the age of four. Miss Sherwood gasps and says it must have been agonizing to lose a child, then suggests that maybe Papa Amatullo was the one who called the Comedy Company and reported him being underage...and that he did it because he cares about him. Danny stares contemplatively into space as he mulls over that possibility. Later, Danny strolls through Central Park looking sad, and we hear him singing Come What May in the background...and, yeesh, his vocalist abilities are even weaker than Bruno's. He watches a father and son playing football together and smiles wistfully at the sight...then smiles wistfully again when he sees a different father and son bonding at the petting zoo. After that, he sadly ambles around the city and has a series of flashbacks with his friends at school. Doris is regaling her cast mates about her Hank Burgers callback in the dressing room when a sullen looking Danny walks in. He tells them he got fired from the Comedy Company, and Coco says they already heard. He says, "I'll be OK with a little help from my friends...if I have any left." The Fame kids show up for Talent Night at the Knights of St. Anthony Lodge and announce that they're Papa Amatullo's guests...but Papa Amatullo's all, "Wha-a?!" and says he has no idea why his idiot son would invite half the student body to his lodge. The emcee (hey - it's a young Larry Miller!) introduces Danny...and the Fame kids start hooting and loudly carrying on as Danny runs on stage. Danny thanks the lodge members for allowing him to perform, then makes a few lame jokes - at which the audience pretends to bust a gut laughing - while an irked looking Papa Amatullo glances around for the nearest exit. He gets up and tries to make a break for it when Danny abruptly puts an end to his act and sadly announces to the audience that he doesn't have a planned finish for his act. Doris leaps up and shrieks, "Was that our cue?!" (No...I don't think so) and runs onto the stage and announces to the bewildered onlookers that the Fame kids are the big closing number. Suddenly, the students rush toward the front of the room and begin performing the Stand up at the mic and just say what's on your mind...boogie boogie number they were rehearsing at the beginning of the episode. Leroy, Julie, and Coco join in with the singing...and when Danny takes the mic and sings along in his grisly, out-of-tune voice, Papa Amatullo stares intently at him and starts to look very impressed.
 
 
Back at Casa Amatullo, Danny’s browsing the fridge for something to eat. Papa Amatullo is sitting at the kitchen table and grudgingly admits that the people at the lodge laughed a lot at his jokes, then asks him if his audiences always laugh. Danny says sometimes they do, sometimes they don't (mostly they don't). Papa Amatullo asks, "Are you through with those funny pills?" and Danny shamefully replies that he flushed them down the toilet. He asks his dad why he got up to leave mid-way through his act, so Papa Amatullo explains that when he heard all the laughing, he started to well up with tears and didn't want people to see him crying. He suddenly gets all verklempt and squeaks, "You made me real proud tonight." Danny walks over to his dad, puts his hand on shoulder and says, "I love you" then kisses his forehead...and Papa Amatullo pulls him into a tight hug as they both tear up.

Ebay of the Week


This week a signed "Metamorphosis" script from The Actors Fund's FAME 35th Anniversary Reunion Concert.

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Thursday, 3 August 2017

Fame - L.A. Reunion 2017 - Full Cast






Fame - L.A. Reunion 2017 -  Full Cast

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A huge thanks to Joseph Nicholas DeFilippis, Sue Hinds, Lynn Isenberg & Startrak Photos for the video and pictures.

Visit Sue's Fame Reunion Concerts Live Footage Facebook Page
 


Alternate Video

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Alternate Professionally filmed Video by The Actors Fund. Donate to The Actors Fund